Track shipments

You can take these sports cars to the track

The flow sports car The market is more diverse than ever, with traditional coupes and roadsters now sharing space with super-SUVs and electric vehicles. As different as they are, they almost all share a common goal: to be great to drive on a circuit. Why? Well, in many parts of the world, speed cameras and digital surveillance on the roads are becoming the norm, and as a result, it’s becoming more difficult to find places to take full advantage of the performance of a sports car or a supercar.

RELATED: 10 Coolest Project Cars We’d Pick For A Home Build

With a track, there are no speeding fines or police officers to worry about, which is perhaps why many track days see spectator numbers increase year on year. Often sports cars will need a few modifications to really shine on the track; for example, the Subaru BRZ handles very well but in stock it lacks a bit of power. However, none of the following ten cars will have such problems. They are already perfectly equipped for a day on the circuit, and since they are all road-legal, you can drive home afterwards.

ten Nissan GTR


2022 Nissan GTR Front 3/4 in Blue
Through Nissan

Godzilla may no longer be the cut-price affair it once was, but there’s no denying that the 2022 car can still keep up with the best in terms of raw performance. Its AWD setup and blistering acceleration make it the perfect candidate for a daily driver who will still tear up a trail.


Blue 2022 Nissan GTR on the highway above the city
Through Nissan

With a starting price of $115,000 for a base GTR, it’s far from the cheapest option here, but it’s one of the most versatile. It technically has four seats, although it’s a challenge trying to crush someone larger than a child in the rear two.

9 BAC Mono


BAC Mono R
Via LAC

At the other end of the versatility spectrum is the BAC Mono, an F1-inspired single-seater that probably shouldn’t be road legal, but sort of is. Built in Liverpool in the UK, the Mono is designed primarily for track use, and it’s not easy (or comfortable) to drive one on the road.


BAC Mono R
Via LAC

Still, it can be done, and as far as track-ready sports cars go, it doesn’t get much better than this. It would be almost a shame to even consider modifying it, although anyone with enough pockets could probably convince BAC to add even more power to their 332hp mill.

8 Lotus Emira


2023 Lotus Emira in the studio
Via Lotus

The newest and arguably best-looking Lotus in years, the Emira combines the track-ready sportiness of the Elise with the more comfortable GT setup of the Evora. Reviewers who managed to drive early prototypes have suggested that the Emira is just as sharp to drive as any other Lotus, but it looks much more refined.

RELATED: 10 Things We Now Know About The Lotus Emira


Lotus Emira 2023 front 3/4 view
Via Lotus

It’s also the last petrol-powered car the brand will produce, as they plan to go electric by the end of the decade. Lotus has opened up the backlog for Launch Edition buyers, so it’s best to be quick and get one before it’s gone forever.

7 Honda Civic Type R


Honda Civic Type R
Through Honda

Buying a big sports car doesn’t have to cost as much as a small house, as the Honda Civic Type R proves. It’s the latest iteration of the best-selling premium Civic, with five seats, generous cargo space…and a setup ready to tear up any circuit it comes upon.


Honda Civic Type R
Through Honda

It’s a genuinely fun car to launch, but it also feels more precise to drive than previous generations, with a renewed focus on its chassis setup and cornering dynamics. At a bargain starting price of just $38,000, this is one of the best track toys for buyers on a budget.

6 Jannarelly Design-1


Jannarelly Design-1
Via Jannarelly

Startup automaker Jannarelly has wowed critics and buyers with its first car, the Design-1. With a 300hp 3.5L V6 engine and a development program that has seen the car tested on some of the best tracks in the world, it certainly has the right pedigree to make a big impact on the market.


Jannarelly Design-1
Via Jannarelly

The Franco-Emirati company has a factory in Dubai and is currently filling initial customer orders for the car, which has a starting price of around $100,000. It’s not yet available in the US, but customers in Europe and the Middle East will find a surprisingly attractive option for the usual cohort of road-legal track-day toys.

5 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500


2020 Shelby GT500
Via Mecum

It’s hard to go wrong with some old-school American muscle, and the Shelby GT500 delivers just that in spades. With a starting price of around $73,000, its price is reasonable considering the power buyers have access to.


2020 Shelby GT500
Via Mecum

The Carbon Fiber Track Pack is available from the factory to make this super-Mustang the ultimate track-day monster, but even in regular form the GT500 will happily leave rivals costing twice as much in the dust. .

4 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS


The front of a green 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
Via Porsche

When it comes to value for money, the Porsche 718 Cayman makes a great alternative to the company’s flagship, the 911. There are a variety of trims and configurations available, but the mid-range GTS strikes an excellent balance. between initial cost and capacity.


Porsche 718 Cayman GTS
Via Porsche

It’s a thrill around the track, but it’s still surprisingly comfortable and refined for everyday riding. The track-focused GT4 specification is another recommended option, though it adds nearly $20,000 more to the car’s initial purchase price.


3 BMW M2 Competition


BMW M2 Competition
Via BMW Media

There’s no doubt that the BMW M2 Competition has been one of the brand’s best racing cars for decades. It’s a winning formula, with a 3.0L straight-six engine powering the rear wheels through a six-speed manual transmission.

RELATED: 10 Things We Love About The BMW M2 Competition


BMW M2 Competition
Via BMW Media

Initial production of the car ended in 2021, although it’s still possible to find near-new examples with less than 1,000 miles on the clock. A new generation of M2 is reportedly on the way soon, although it has not been confirmed whether it will use the same powertrain or transmission.


2 Ariel Atom


Ariel Atom 4
By Ariel

Taking a car to the track is meant to be a raw and thrilling experience, and there aren’t many better cars for a raw experience than an Ariel Atom. It’s barely a car, to begin with, as there are no doors, roof, or real protection from the elements for the driver.


Ariel Atom 4
By Ariel

It won’t be very practical off the track, but on that it’s a one-of-a-kind experience. It won’t need any mods or upgrades to knock its rider’s socks off, because it’s blazingly fast straight from the factory.

1 Porsche 911 GT3


The front of the new 911 GT3 on the track
Via Porsche

It might seem like the obvious choice, but it’s impossible to write an article about track-ready sports cars and not include a Porsche 911. The base variants of the car can be a little soft on drivers. more demanding, but step up to a GT3-spec example and even the most demanding track enthusiasts will be pleased.


Rear 3/4 view of the 911 GT3 on the track
Via Porsche

It’s no coincidence that every time Porsche releases a new track-focused 911, its order books fill up almost immediately. Decades of development of the 911 in motorsport and on the road have meant that it is better than almost anything out there in terms of pure driver engagement, as the thousands of satisfied GT3 owners will no doubt d ‘OK.


1979 AMC Spirit AMX

We’d take these cheap American sports cars to the track over a Mustang any day

Read more


About the Author